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Colombian Museum Hosts Largest Exhibition Ever in Latin America of Andy Warhol’s Works

Mao_by_Andy_WarholThe exhibition, organized by Museo de Arte del Banco de la República in conjunction with the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and curated by Philip Larratt-Smith, offers a complete panorama of the work of this fertile artist and it is the largest exhibition ever organized in a Latin American museum. The list of works of art comprises 26 paintings, 57 silk screens, 39 photographs and 2 installations (‘Silver Clouds’ and ‘Cow wallpaper’). Fourteen of his films will also be screened at the Fundación Gilberto Alzate Avendaño. Andy Warhol, “Mr. America” explores all aspects and periods from this multi-facetic production from this artist, with a particular emphasis in the period between 1961 and 1968. On exhibition 18 June through 21 September, 2009.

It was during the 1960s that Warhol began to make paintings of iconic American products such as Campbell’s Soup Cans from the Campbell Soup Company and Coca-Cola bottles, as well as paintings of celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe, Troy Donahue, and Elizabeth Taylor. He founded “The Factory,” his studio during these years, and gathered around himself a wide range of artists, writers, musicians, and underground celebrities. He began producing prints using the silkscreen method. His work became popular and controversial.

Among the imagery tackled by Warhol were dollar bills, celebrities and brand name products. He also used as imagery for his paintings newspaper headlines of photographs of mushroom clouds, electric chairs, and police dogs attacking civil rights protesters. Warhol also used Coca Cola bottles as subject matter for paintings.

New York’s Museum of Modern Art hosted a Symposium on pop art in December 1962 during which artists like Warhol were attacked for “capitulating” to consumerism. Critics were scandalized by Warhol’s open embrace of market culture. This symposium set the tone for Warhol’s reception. Throughout the decade it became more and more clear that there had been a profound change in the culture of the art world, and that Warhol was at the center of that shift.

A pivotal event was the 1964 exhibit The American Supermarket, a show held in Paul Bianchini’s Upper East Side gallery. The show was presented as a typical U.S. small supermarket environment, except that everything in it from the produce, canned goods, meat, posters on the wall, etc. were created by six prominent pop artists of the time including the controversial (and like-minded) Billy Apple, Mary Inman, and Robert Watts. Warhol’s painting of a can of Campbell’s soup cost $1,500 while each autographed can sold for $6. The exhibit was one of the first mass events that directly confronted the general public with both pop art and the perennial question of what is art.

As an advertisement illustrator in the 1950s, Warhol used assistants to increase his productivity. Collaboration would remain a defining (and controversial) aspect of his working methods throughout his career; in the 1960s, however, this was particularly true. One of the most important collaborators during this period was Gerard Malanga. Malanga assisted the artist with producing silkscreens, films, sculpture, and other works at “The Factory”, Warhol’s aluminum foil-and-silver-paint-lined studio on 47th Street (later moved to Broadway). Other members of Warhol’s Factory crowd included Freddie Herko, Ondine, Ronald Tavel, Mary Woronov, Billy Name, and Brigid Berlin (from whom he apparently got the idea to tape record his phone conversations).

During the 60s, Warhol also groomed a retinue of bohemian eccentrics upon whom he bestowed the designation “Superstars”, including Edie Sedgwick, Viva, and Ultra Violet. These people all participated in the Factory films, and some, like Berlin, remained friends with Warhol until his death. Important figures in the New York underground art/cinema world, such as writer John Giorno and film-maker Jack Smith, also appear in Warhol films of the 1960s, revealing Warhol’s connections to a diverse range of artistic scenes during this period.

The Museo de Arte del Banco de la República inaugurated in 2004, next door to the Museo Botero, it houses the bank’s art collection and different art exhibits throughout the year. Opens Mondays through Saturdays -except Tuesdays- from 9 am to 7pm. Sundays from 10 am to 5 pm. Visit : www.lablaa.org/museodearte.htm

June 22, 2009 Posted by | Art Exhibitions, Artists, News, photography, raw art gallery | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

PHotoEspaña opens Annie Leibovitz – A Photographer’s Life: 1990-2005

Leibovitz_pregnant_Demi_MooreAn exhibition gathering 220 pictures of important culture and showbusiness figures, works made to order and images showing family intimacy of Annie Leibovitz. The exhibition gets to Madrid after having been in the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris, the National Portrait Gallery (London) and the C/O Berlin. Annie Leibovitz is one of the best-known portrait photographers in the world. Throughout her career she has redefined the concept of celebrity portraits, changing existing preconceived ideas on the people who populate the cultural landscape.

The exhibition, which offers 220 works, shows famous portraits of public figures such as Jamie Foxx, Nicole Kidman and Brad Pitt as well as the memorable photo of a pregnant Demi Moore. It also includes portraits of artists, architects and writers, such as Richard Avedon, Philip Johnson and Cindy Sherman. Commissioned works are also presented, such as her reportage on the siege of Sarajevo in the 1990s or on Hillary Clinton’s election as a member of the United States Senate. A major part of the exhibition are Leibovitz’s personal photographs, which testify to private moments in her life, such as the birth and childhood of her daughters and her family reunions.

Annie Leibovitz (Connecticut, 1949) studied painting at the San Francisco Art Institute and attended photography classes. She was the chief photographer for Rolling Stone magazine. In 1983 she entered Vanity Fair and in 1998 Vogue. She is the author of influential advertising campaigns for American Express, Louis Vuitton and Givenchy. Her work has been published on numerous occasions and displayed at the International Center of Photography in New York and the National Portrait Gallery in London.

June 22, 2009 Posted by | Art Exhibitions, Artists, News, photography, raw art gallery | , , | 3 Comments

   

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